Sanna Arvidsson

&

thepeoplesrecord:

Peruvian anti-logging activist Edwin Chota killedSeptember 10, 2014
An outspoken Peruvian opponent of illegal logging and three other native Ashaninka community leaders were slain in a remote region bordering Brazil, tribal authorities said Monday.
The activist, Edwin Chota, had received frequent death threats from illegal loggers, who he had tried for years to expel from the lands for which his community was seeking title.
Illegal loggers were suspected in the killings, Ashaninka regional leader Reyder Sebastian Quiltiquari said by phone. Pervasive corruption lets the loggers operate with impunity, stripping the Amazon region’s river basins of prized hardwoods, especially mahogany and tropical cedar.
"He threatened to upset the status quo," said David Salisbury, a professor at the University of Richmond who was advising Chota on the title quest and had known him for a decade. "The illegal loggers are on record for wanting Edwin dead."
Chota, who was in his early 50s, and the others were killed about a week ago while returning to Saweto, the community he led on the Upper Tamaya river, from a meeting about the logging issue with Ashaninka leaders in the nearby Brazilian village of Apiwtxa, said Mr. Sebastian.
He said his information was still preliminary, but that a Saweto villager said via radio that the men’s dismembered bodies were found at the community’s edge. Chota would frequently confront firearms-carrying loggers, he added, a machete his only weapon.
The other slain men were identified by a police official in Pucallpa, the regional capital, as Jorge Rios, who was Chota’s deputy, Leoncio Quincicima and Francisco Pinedo.
Peru’s main indigenous federation, AIDESEP, expressed outrage at police and the judiciary in a statement for “doing absolutely nothing despite repeated complaints” to protect their brothers slain “defending their ancestral lands.”
A commission of indigenous leaders from Saweto’s district was expected later Monday in Pucallpa to meet with a government vice minister, said Mr. Sebastian. The police official, Carlos Quispe, said authorities later planned to fly by helicopter to retrieve the bodies.
Chota had campaigned for six years for the title for his community, emboldening other settlements along the Tamaya to similar seek legal claim to traditional lands, Mr. Sebastian said.
Now, he said, people in those communities fear for their lives. He said he would demand a meeting with President Ollanta Humala to obtain assurances for their safety.
Ashaninka are Peru’s No. 1 Amazon ethnic group, numbering some 92,000, and Mr. Sebastian says violence against them has been rising since they began agitating for titles to their territories.
Chota had written more than 100 letters to state institutions about illegal logging and titling efforts in Ucayali, said Mr. Salisbury, “and he was an incredible incredibly dynamic and charismatic leader who gave hope to not just his community but many others by his courage and convictions.”
He said he and Chota personally met with Peru’s national forestry director, Fabiola Muñoz, in July and that forestry inspectors had just visited forestry concessions that overlapped with Saweto that were being logged without permission.
Telephone calls to Ms. Muñoz seeking comment on the progress of Chota’s titling efforts weren’t immediately returned.
Chota’s region is home to about 80% of illegal logging in Peru, which thrives on a web of corruption involving the widespread issuance of counterfeit logging permits.
For years, said Mr. Salisbury, large amounts of timber have been taken from Saweto – and from the Brazilian side of the Tamaya River – and floated downriver to saw mills in Pucallpa.
"It’s impossible to monitor where the timber is coming from," he said.
The wood from a single old-growth mahogany tree can fetch more than $11,000 on the U.S. lumber market, the nonprofit Environmental Investigation Agency said in a 2012 report on Peru’s troubled forest-concession system.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Peruvian anti-logging activist Edwin Chota killed
September 10, 2014

An outspoken Peruvian opponent of illegal logging and three other native Ashaninka community leaders were slain in a remote region bordering Brazil, tribal authorities said Monday.

The activist, Edwin Chota, had received frequent death threats from illegal loggers, who he had tried for years to expel from the lands for which his community was seeking title.

Illegal loggers were suspected in the killings, Ashaninka regional leader Reyder Sebastian Quiltiquari said by phone. Pervasive corruption lets the loggers operate with impunity, stripping the Amazon region’s river basins of prized hardwoods, especially mahogany and tropical cedar.

"He threatened to upset the status quo," said David Salisbury, a professor at the University of Richmond who was advising Chota on the title quest and had known him for a decade. "The illegal loggers are on record for wanting Edwin dead."

Chota, who was in his early 50s, and the others were killed about a week ago while returning to Saweto, the community he led on the Upper Tamaya river, from a meeting about the logging issue with Ashaninka leaders in the nearby Brazilian village of Apiwtxa, said Mr. Sebastian.

He said his information was still preliminary, but that a Saweto villager said via radio that the men’s dismembered bodies were found at the community’s edge. Chota would frequently confront firearms-carrying loggers, he added, a machete his only weapon.

The other slain men were identified by a police official in Pucallpa, the regional capital, as Jorge Rios, who was Chota’s deputy, Leoncio Quincicima and Francisco Pinedo.

Peru’s main indigenous federation, AIDESEP, expressed outrage at police and the judiciary in a statement for “doing absolutely nothing despite repeated complaints” to protect their brothers slain “defending their ancestral lands.”

A commission of indigenous leaders from Saweto’s district was expected later Monday in Pucallpa to meet with a government vice minister, said Mr. Sebastian. The police official, Carlos Quispe, said authorities later planned to fly by helicopter to retrieve the bodies.

Chota had campaigned for six years for the title for his community, emboldening other settlements along the Tamaya to similar seek legal claim to traditional lands, Mr. Sebastian said.

Now, he said, people in those communities fear for their lives. He said he would demand a meeting with President Ollanta Humala to obtain assurances for their safety.

Ashaninka are Peru’s No. 1 Amazon ethnic group, numbering some 92,000, and Mr. Sebastian says violence against them has been rising since they began agitating for titles to their territories.

Chota had written more than 100 letters to state institutions about illegal logging and titling efforts in Ucayali, said Mr. Salisbury, “and he was an incredible incredibly dynamic and charismatic leader who gave hope to not just his community but many others by his courage and convictions.”

He said he and Chota personally met with Peru’s national forestry director, Fabiola Muñoz, in July and that forestry inspectors had just visited forestry concessions that overlapped with Saweto that were being logged without permission.

Telephone calls to Ms. Muñoz seeking comment on the progress of Chota’s titling efforts weren’t immediately returned.

Chota’s region is home to about 80% of illegal logging in Peru, which thrives on a web of corruption involving the widespread issuance of counterfeit logging permits.

For years, said Mr. Salisbury, large amounts of timber have been taken from Saweto – and from the Brazilian side of the Tamaya River – and floated downriver to saw mills in Pucallpa.

"It’s impossible to monitor where the timber is coming from," he said.

The wood from a single old-growth mahogany tree can fetch more than $11,000 on the U.S. lumber market, the nonprofit Environmental Investigation Agency said in a 2012 report on Peru’s troubled forest-concession system.

Source

Sometimes I wish politics could just reframe the question.

Not about what we as a society think about homosexuality,
but what we think of the idea of denying other people love.

Not about what we as a society think about £10 more a month,
but what we want our collective lives to be.

Not about what we as a society think a woman’s place should be,
but what we as a society think about dictating places based on gender in the first place.

Not about how much immigration costs,
but how we as human beings can argue about other lives in terms of incomes and outgoings.

Not about how much we should pay in tax,
but about whether we think it’s reasonable that people are denied healthcare or life saving treatments based on how much money they have in their pockets.

I wish we could all just look up from our individual lives and see the bigger picture.

We’re in it together.

"Politicians are all the same, it doesn’t matter who you vote for."
“Don’t vote, it just encourages them.”
“The pharmaceutical industry is so messed up, I only do alternative medicine these days.”
“I rely on homeopathy, non of that dodgy pharmaceutical stuff.”

To my middle-class, healthy, white friends who post this shit on facebook:

So, important institutions are at risk and are being compromised and your solution is to give up and let it all fall apart?

Why can you choose this solution, why can you choose to give the finger to both democracy and to medicine? Because you’re priviliged, most likely.

Because to you, it doesn’t matter which party comes to power, because your life will likely stay the same. To you it doesn’t matter if we have a racist party in parliament, because you’re part of a priviliged group of white people. To you it doesn’t matter if the parties speak for or against austerity because you don’t have to rely on the institutions of the state to get through your life. To you it doesn’t matter if one party will persecute immigrants because you are not one of them. To you it doesn’t matter that education becomes privatised because you’ll find a way to provide for your childrens education anyway, or you plan not to have any and you do not care about the welfare of society as a whole.

And to you, it doesn’t matter if the clinical research is screwed up, because you don’t have a chronic disease and neither does anyone close to you. You don’t have to bother your brain with thoughts of trial data going missing or researchers being biased because for you, all you need is a cup of green tea and a sandwich and your morning is complete, as opposed to the millions of people who rely on medicines to even be able to function, and to whom these things are matters of life and death. It doesn’t matter to you that homeopathic remedies have never been proven to be more effective than placebo because your ailments have never been crippling in the first place. You don’t have to read the books, lobby for change, visit your GP or your specialist doctor regularly or be treated for life threatening conditions. You are priviliged enough to grab some advice from some blog online and go on a banana detox and chew some kale and think that somehow that could work for everyone. Nothing bad about kale or a good diet, but wake the fuck up, not everyone’s choice is that simple.

Many people depend on medical science for their lives, and if we, who don’t or at least don’t yet, take our eyes off the ball, and sit on our priviliged thrones of alternatives remedies that haven’t even been proven to work, and tut at the medical science, and won’t apply ourselves, and won’t try to fix what’s wrong with the pharmaceutical industry, we’re telling millions of sick people that they’re on their own. They are stuck in a fucked up situation, with fucked up corporations, fucking with their lives, and we, who have the privilige not to bother about whether drug A or drug B will save our life, sit there with a mug of green tea and preach about the wonders of the alternative.

It’s not an alternative for everyone.

And we, who are able to work, who are part of the priviliged groups, who won’t be struck down unto the ground by austerity policies and to whom it doesn’t much matter in our day to day lives whether party A or party B wins, we are telling the people less priviliged than us, less empowered, less able to work, less well off, that they’re on their own. That we won’t vote for parties that make a REAL difference in their lives and that we won’t stand against racism, sexism, classism, or any other oppressive force, because this particular oppression doesn’t apply to us. We can choose not voting and being flippant about it.

It’s not a choice for everyone.

So, can we stop for a minute and think about the other people around us? The people who need us, all of us, to lobby for a better health care and for better medical science and research and for better institutions and for better democratic accountability and for better justice systems and for better care, and stop lifting our hands out of the democratic processes that include all of us and leave the heavy lifting to the oppressed, the sick, the poor and the one’s not priviliged enough to turn away from democracy or science based medicine?

Spending 7+ hours sewing, baking and listening to The Fellowship of the Ring on audiobook might be the best choice I’ve ever made. I love my life so much these days that some days I actually cannot believe my luck.

qahera:

This is less of a superhero comic and more of a tribute. I remember at one point during the revolution, people would use statistics of attacks on women to discredit political movements – and Egyptians – at large. This keeps happening, consistently, both locally and internationally. People will abuse statistics as they see fit, but they will always ignore the women at the base of those statistics. So, politics and superpowers aside, here is my attempt at a tribute to real-life superheroes.

other qahera comics | facebook page

also featured on rebelmusic.com

Amazing.

(Source: qahera)

The sky is like a water colour painting. It’s almost midnight and still this much light. #nofilter #sweden
Old school book on preserving foods.
This morning, I woke up in paradise.
Killing time at the cafe #drawing
Crappy book, don’t bother reading it. I wasted my attention reading more than 300 pages of this puff of wind. Read something else, like Steinbeck, a good King or the back of a shampoo bottle. Just don’t read this. It’s boring and it’s stupid.